Another argument for Open Borders: It is good for the quality for football!

There is no doubt that I strongly favour a policy of removing restrictions on immigrations. Nathan Smith in his recent guest post on my blog showed that a policy of global Open Borders would significantly boost global GDP. However, there might be even better arguments for Open Borders.

My friend Ben Southwood, Head of Policy at the Adam Smith Institute, in a new paper argues that the “crackdown on foreign players hurts English football”. You might not buy Nathan’s arguments, but you should certainly buy Ben’s arguments for Open Borders in international football (to my American readers: Soccer).

This is the abstract from Ben’s paper:

It is a very common view that “importing” foreign football players into the UK to play in the Premier League leads to less opportunity for English players to play for these teams. This means that English players get less high-level experience, and consequently aren’t as good as the players of Spain, France, Italy or Ger- man, who make up a larger fraction of the players playing in their home leagues. This, the argument runs, is an important factor in explaining the English national team’s perceived underperformance in international competitions. I review the literature and present novel data establishing a negative relationship between current performance (as measured by FIFA ranking) and the current amount of football played in a league by native players (across Spain, England, Germany and Italy). Further, I find no relationship between minutes played by English players in the Premier League five or ten years ago and current performance. Finally, I find strong evidence that a league’s overall strength (as measured by its UEFA coefficient) is predicted by the current amount of foreigners playing in it. To restrict foreign players would not directly benefit the English national team, but it would risk substantially curtailing the overall quality of the world’s most popular football league.

PS in my favourite team FC Copenhagen there are very few Danish players and the best “Danish” players have immigrant background. Thank god for immigration and free trade in footballers!

PPS this is my son’s favourite (now former) FC Copenhagen player Igor Vetokele.

Igor

Scott Sumner’s Adam Smith Lecture

Last week Scott Sumner gave a lecture in London on the causes of the Great Recession and Market Monetarism. I had the honour of introducing Scott and you might me hear interrupting Scott near the end of the presentation. Scott made a lot more sense than I did.

Watch Scott’s Adam Smith lecture here.

Enjoy.

HT Sam Bowman

Scott Sumner will be in London next week

This is from the Adam Smith Institute:

Adam Smith Lecture with Scott Sumner

Speaker: Scott Sumner

Date: Tuesday 17 June 2014

Time: 07:00pm – 07:00pm

RSVP: events@adamsmith.org

Location: 10-11 Carlton House Terrace

Map: find us!

Scott Sumner is an American economist who shot to fame between 2009 and 2013 as a result of his blog, themoneyillusion.com, and was in 2012 named the world’s 15th top thinker by Foreign Policy—the same rank as then-Federal Reserve Governor Ben Bernanke.

Prof. Sumner is the father of market monetarism, a macroeconomic school of thought centred on markets and money. Though it takes its foundations from academic work, including that of Robert Lucas, Eugene Fama and of course Milton Friedman, it arose largely on the blogosphere. The Atlantic named Sumner “the blogger who saved the US economy” after his ideas were seen as part of the intellectual support that convinced the Fed to implement QE3. And his view that central banks should target total spending—nominal GDP—rather than consumer price inflation has provoked comment from, among others, Mark Carney.

Prof Sumner teaches at Bentley University, a small, well-regarded private college in Massachusetts. His academic papers—which tackle subjects ranging from whether the US should privatise its mint to the causes of business cycles and recessions—have been featured in prestigious journals including the Journal of Money, Credit & Banking and the Journal of Political Economy.

Please let me (ben@adamsmith.org) know if you’re a journalist and you’d like to arrange an interview with Prof. Sumner.

 

Prediction markets and UK monetary policy

I have long argued that central banks should utilise prediction markets for macroeconomic forecasting and for the implementation of monetary policy.

In today’s edition of the UK business daily City AM I have an oped on this topic and about how the Bank of England should have a closer look at prediction markets. See here:

IN HIS first major speech since becoming governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney is today likely to defend a policy that has come to be described as the “Carney rule”. Also known as forward guidance, the rule effectively promises that interest rates will stay at present levels until unemployment drops below 7 per cent, so long as the Bank’s inflation forecast does not top 2.5 per cent.
 
This kind of forward guidance is welcome news for the financial markets. We will now at least have some sort of map to navigate monetary policy, instead of relying on insinuations from the lips of the wise men on the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC).
 
But this still leaves markets at the mercy of the Bank of England’s internal forecasters, whose credibility can certainly be questioned. The Bank doesn’t need to be biased to consistently predict that it will hit its inflation target, for example (though what institution would forecast that it will fail?). Even with the best incentives, it cannot possibly bring together all the private knowledge spread across investors, firms and households.
 
It is this inability of elite central planners to gather such a wide source of information that led even committed Marxist GA Cohen to agree that markets may be necessary for a rational economic system. No individual, however intelligent, can know enough about the economy to make a really reliable prediction about it.
 
And it’s not just the dragging-together of information from thousands of different sources that makes market predictions more accurate than those made by small elite groups. Investors betting in markets have skin in the game; they have an extremely strong incentive to get their bets right, since they will lose money for bad (inaccurate) bets and win money for good (accurate) ones.
Read the rest of the piece here.
 
And Mark Carney is lucky that he now in fact has a prediction market to look at. This is from a press release from the Adam Smith Institute:

Today we’ve launched two betting markets to try to use the ‘wisdom of crowds’ to beat government economic forecasters….The Bank of England’s economic forecasts have been wrong again and again. To counter this, the free market Adam Smith Institute is today (Wednesday 28th August) launching two betting markets where members of the public can bet on UK inflation and unemployment rates, taking the government’s experts on at their own game. The markets are designed to aggregate individual predictions about the economy’s prospects to use the ‘wisdom of crowds’ to beat the predictions of government experts.

The launch coincides with Mark Carney’s first major speech as governor of the Bank of England and follows his announcement earlier this month that the Bank will consider both inflation and unemployment when deciding monetary policy.
Read more here.
 
It will extremely interesting to follow how this prediction market will work and it will obviously be very interesting to see how it will impact the monetary policy debate in the UK. My hope certainly is that it will help the case for market-driven monetary policy implementation and also help “police” the Bank of England’s forecasts.
 
 
 
 
 
%d bloggers like this: